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WILD WOMEN DON'T HAVE THE BLUES
WILD WOMEN DON'T HAVE THE BLUES Bookmark and Share
DVD and Site/Local Streaming plus DVD
58 minutes, 1989
Producer/Director: Christine Dall
ABOUT THE FILM


Wild Women Don't Have the Blues shows how the blues were born out of the economic and social transformation of African American life early in this century. It recaptures the lives and times of Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Ida Cox, Alberta Hunter, Ethel Waters and the other legendary women who made the blues a vital part of American culture. The film brings together for the first time dozens of rare, classic renditions of the early blues.

What we call the blues can be traced back to the work songs of generations of Black fieldhands. Ma Rainey, "Mother of the Blues," first put this folk idiom on stage in 1902. Others, like Ida Cox and Bessie Smith, took songs like "Downhearted Blues" and "Jailhouse Blues" on the road with traveling vaudeville and minstrel shows.

The Blues performers provided cultural continuity for millions of blacks who migrated from the rural South to the industrial cities of the North during World War I. Mamie Smith broke new ground in the 1920s when she shouted out "Crazy Blues" - the first blues recording by a a black woman and one that opened up the recording industry to black artists. Bessie Smith brought black music to a national audience in the groundbreaking early "talkie" St. Louis Blues.

Survivors of the blues era remind us that celebrity status offered little protection against segregation and economic exploitation. Few of these women received much financial reward from their popularity.

With the Depression, American musical taste shifted towards the upbeat sounds of swing, and the classic blues died out. Yet as contemporary Chicago blues artist Koko Taylor reminds us, the blues and their legacy continue. "You get up in the morning and go to work and your boss tells you you been laid off. Your got the blues. Believe it or not, even the President's got the blues."

Click here to read an obituary for the late Koko Taylor.
CRITICAL COMMENT
"A superb look at the idiom and its origins."
Los Angeles Times
"A must for libraries, high schools, colleges and just about everybody else."
Sightlines
"Shows how America changed after WWI when a wave of black immigrants left the South searching fro work...Plenty of sparkle and wit."
Boston Globe
"History at its very best."
Leon Litwack, University of California-Berkeley
"A brilliant film that reveals the central role of women performers in the blues."
William Ferris, Executive Director, National Endowment for the Humanities
"Teaches tremendously moving lessons about race, gender and class...Invaluable in women's studies, history and music course."
Pat Gozemba, National Women's Studies Association

PRICING
College/Corporation/Gov't Agency
DVD + Site/Local Streaming License
 $195.00 Site/Local Streaming plus DVD

High Schools, Public Libraries, HBCU & Qualifying Community Organization Discounted DVD License Without Streaming Rights
 $49.95 DVD

Home Video DVD License - Restrictions Apply
 $24.95 DVD

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